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A Timeline of UO Sociology

1894: Course 72 Sociology is first offered by Dr. Chapman, under the Political and Social Science course of study. The course is worth 1 credit.

The first Sociology course offered at University of Oregon in 1894.
Source: UO Archives, courtesy of UO Libraries

1895: Dr. Frederick Young teaches his first Sociology course at UO. Dr. Young was a professor of Economics and Sociology and would later serve as Dean of the Graduate School (1900-1920) and Dean of the School of Sociology (1919-1929). Dr. Young was also a founding member of the American Sociological Society (now the American Sociological Association).

1919: The School of Sociology is founded at UO, thanks largely to the work of Dr. Young. Alongside an extension campus in Portland, the School focuses primarily on social work and social welfare activism. Both BA and MA degrees are offered.

1930: Facing Great Depression budget cuts, UO transfers a number of programs and faculty to Oregon State Agricultural College (now Oregon State University in Corvallis, OR). The School of Sociology is dissolved and replaced with the Department of Sociology within the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.

1954: The first PhD in Sociology at UO is jointly conferred upon Gail Fullerton and Snell Putney, who were married at the time. Both went on to become teaching faculty at San Jose State University, and Dr. Fullerton eventually became their first female president. Together they co-authored The Adjusted American.

Gail Fullerton was the first female president of San Jose State University, where she was faculty from 1968 until her retirement in 1991.
Dr. Fullerton became president in 1978, the first professor to rise to such rank at SJSU since 1900.
Source: The Mercury News, San Jose, CA

1958: UO Sociologists begin serving as editors of the Pacific Sociological Review, now Sociological Perspectives, the journal of the Pacific Sociological Association. Today several faculty serve as advising editors, including Ryan Light, Jill Ann Harrison, Clare Evans, Eileen M. Otis, Ellen K. Scott, and professors emeriti Robert O’Brien and Jean Stockard.

1963: The Sociology department makes its initial move into Prince Lucien Campbell Hall (also known as PLC), occupying a number of basement and first floor offices. Today the department has “moved up” and is largely housed on the 6th and 7th floors of PLC (which did not yet exist at the time).

1967: The first female sociologist is appointed to the faculty, Dr. Joan Acker. Dr. Acker’s expansive body of work would come to be considered a leading analysis of gender and class in second-wave feminism, and today she continues to be the second-most cited UO sociologist.

1970: In the wake of the protests and subsequent military violence at Kent State University, UO experiences a number of violent incidents including a bomb hurled into the first floor of PLC which destroyed several Sociology faculty offices. Despite an intense and controversial investigation by university leadership, local police and even the FBI, the perpetrator was never positively identified.

Exterior of PLC post-bombing
Source: Eugene Register-Guard, October 3, 1970
Interior of PLC post-bombing.
Source: Eugene Register-Guard, October 3, 1970

1970: UO Sociology awards 17 PhDs and creates a departmental record for graduating doctoral class size.

1971: Faculty in UO Sociology begin editing a volume known as The Insurgent Sociologist, which began two years earlier as a result of an uprising of the “Sociology Liberation Movement” at the 1969 ASA meetings. Today the journal is titled Critical Sociology and is edited at Wayne State University in Michigan.

1972: Dr. Albert Szymanski, prominent scholar of Marxist theory and political economy of the USSR, joins the UO Sociology faculty; his arrival signaled the department’s growing strength in Marxist sociology for which it is still known today.

1972: Dr. Acker, along with several other UO feminist scholars and with support from UO President Robert Clark, found the Center for the Sociological Study of Women (now known as the Center for the Study of Women in Society). Today the center continues to support and produce feminist research on campus.


The founders of CSWS, with Dr. Joan Acker in the center.

1980: The Environmental Studies Program emerges from the Center of Environmental Studies, led largely by Richard Gale, the first environmental sociologist at UO. UO Sociology maintains a strong relationship with Environmental Studies, sharing jointly appointed faculty and dual-enrolled PhD candidates.

1989: Sociology, along with several other social science departments, contributes to the remodeling and revamping of the Social Science Instructional Laboratory (SSIL) on the first level of PLC. Originally opened on a National Science Foundation grant in 1979, the lab had “36 microcomputers, pictures, and fancy software, with a staff and half-time director.” Today SSIL is still open in McKenzie Hall and is primarily used for advanced statistics analysis, access to Geographic Information Systems, and exam proctoring for online courses.

1992: Professor Patricia Gwartney founds the Oregon Survey Research Laboratory, which completed over 250 projects funded by about $8M in grants and contracts before closing in 2005. It is still the largest body of quantitative work attributed to a UO Sociologist.

1992: The late Walter T. Martin, former Department Head and professor emeritus, compiles the first departmental history titled “The Origin and Development of the Sociology Program at the University of Oregon.” (Link opens PDF download)

2009: Professor Emeritus and former Department Head Ben Johnson revises and expands on Dr. Martin’s history in a new document titled “A Brief History of the Sociology Department at the University of Oregon.” (Link opens PDF download)

2010: 7450 undergraduate students take sociology courses during the academic year, a record high for the department.

2012: 321 undergraduate degrees in Sociology are conferred during the academic year, the highest number ever for the department.

The Class of 2012 receives the commencement address delivered by Lauren Regan (AAL),
executive director of the Civil Liberties Defense Center in Eugene, OR.

2020: The Department of Sociology celebrates its 125th anniversary and hosts the 2020 Pacific Sociological Association conference in Eugene, OR.