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Sociology Major Concentrations

What is a concentration? A concentration is a specific track or subject of study within a major, designed to help students tailor their choices of electives towards a particular interest or career goal. Choosing a concentration in Sociology can help you to identify and strengthen your passion in the field and deepen your knowledge in that specific area. A concentration also serves as a guide to make it easier to choose classes that meet your academic and professional goals. Lastly, a concentration can be listed on your resume as an area of emphasis.

Am I required to choose a concentration? Sociology majors are not required to choose a concentration; the Sociology Generalist track follows the basic major requirements, and serves as the “default” concentration for students who do not choose another one. If you’re unsure if a concentration is right for you, check in with your advisor and/or our undergraduate coordinator, Mike Peixoto.

Does adding a concentration increase the required credits for the major? No! Sociology majors pursuing any track are required to take 16 credits of core major requirements and 32 credits of upper-division SOC electives courses; choosing a concentration provides a framework to use when choosing these classes.

How do I add a concentration? Use this form to let us know which concentration you’d like to add. Requests are submitted to the registrar for processing, and the concentration will appear on your degree guide typically in 2-3 weeks.


Inequalities, Crime & Social Justice

Students will focus on the law, public policy, and the public service side of sociology by looking at inequalities within the United States. Students will examine the causes and consequences of racial, gender, and class inequality as well as explore urban, deviance, and crime issues.

Jobs in this arena:

Lawyer, Public Policy, Public Service, Politics, Community Organization, Criminal Justice

Student Gains:

  • Ability to analyze social institutions
  • Skills to evaluate contemporary social problems
  • Consideration of solutions to social problems

Required Electives:*

  • SOC 345 Race & Ethnicity
  • SOC 380 Intro to Deviance, Control & Crime
  • SOC 484 Issues in Deviance, Control & Crime [Topic]
  • Pick one from:
    • SOC 301 American Society
    • SOC 304 Community, Environment & Society
    • SOC 313 Social Issues & Movements
    • SOC 355 Sociology of Gender
    • SOC 370 Urban Sociology
  • Pick two from:
    • SOC 442 Issues in Urban Sociology [Topic]
    • SOC 445 Race & Ethnicity [Topic]
    • SOC 451 Social Stratification
    • SOC 465 Political Sociology
    • SOC 475 Marxist Sociological Theory
  • 12 credits from any SOC courses (not including core major requirements)

View the full list of required courses in the UO Catalog here.

Major Planning Worksheet – Inequalities, Crime & Social Justice

 

Environment, Health, & Community

This concentration looks at the environmental and human conditions within the community and how they affect people living within them. Students learn about how communities work, what makes up communities, and solutions to problems that could be implemented.

Jobs in this arena:

Policy, Climate Change, Community Worker/Advocate, Environmental Science

Student Gains:

  • Deep understanding of human-environment interactions
  • Comprehension of how historical and spatial contexts shape human and community health
  • Society and environment problem-solving skills

Required Electives:*

  • SOC 304 Community, Environment & Society
  • Pick two from:
    • SOC 346 Work & Occupations
    • SOC 370 Urban Sociology
    • SOC 385 Medical Sociology
  • Pick three from:
    • SOC 416 Environmental Sociology [Topic]
    • SOC 442 Issues in Urban Sociology [Topic]
    • SOC 446 Sociology of Work [Topic]
    • SOC 485 Medical Sociology [Topic]
  • 8 credits from any SOC courses (not including core major requirements)

View the full list of required courses in the UO Catalog here.

Major Planing Worksheet – Environment, Health & Community

 

Critical Thinking with Data

Critical Thinking with Data focuses on using social science data to understand social behavior and to inform policy decisions. The capstone of this concentration is the required SOC 413 course in which students will execute an independent research project using a primary data source.

Jobs in this arena:

Data Science, Marketing, Survey Design and Administration, Program Review, Public Opinion Research

Student Gains:

  • Ability to analyze qualitative and quantitative data (emphasis on quantitative data)
  • Familiarity with social science techniques
  • Independent research skills

Required Courses:*

  • SOC 412 Sociological Research Methods I (replaces SOC 312 requirement)
  • SOC 413 Sociological Research Methods II
  • Pick one from:
    • SOC 416 Environmental Sociology [Topic]
    • SOC 442 Issues in Urban Sociology [Topic]
    • SOC 450 Sociology of Developing Areas
    • SOC 456 Feminist Theory
    • SOC 457 Sex & Society
    • SOC 475 Marxist Sociological Theory
    • SOC 484 Issues in Deviance, Control & Crime [Topic]
  • Pick one from:
    • SOC 425 Sociology of the Family [Topic]
    • SOC 445 Race & Ethnicity [Topic]
    • SOC 446 Sociology of Work [Topic]
    • SOC 447 Sociology of Organizations [Topic]
    • SOC 452 Issues of Migration [Topic]
    • SOC 465 Political Sociology
    • SOC 467 Economic Sociology
    • SOC 491 Sociology of Education
  • 12 credits from any 300- or 400-level SOC courses (not including core major requirements)
  • 8 credits from any SOC courses (not including core major requirements)

View the full list of required courses in the UO Catalog here.

Major Planing Worksheet – Critical Thinking With Data

 

Culture, Identities & Institutions

Students will examine how cultures, identities, and institutions influence human behavior, life opportunities, and outcomes. This concentration will look at how power operates, how inequalities emerge, and will also consider solutions to social problems. Theories and methods will be used to analyze organizations, trends, and group experience.

Jobs in this arena:

Social Work, Education, Counseling, Politics, Social Justice, Research and Planning

Students Gain:

  • Engagement in critical thinking and writing
  • Scientific literacy through theories and methods
  • Understanding of how culture and institutions shape life chances and outcomes

Required Electives:*

  • SOC 328 Self & Society
  • Pick one from:
    • SOC 345 Sociology of Race & Ethnicity
    • SOC 355 Sociology of Gender
  • Pick one from:
    • SOC 317 Sociology of Mass Media
    • SOC 330 Sociology of the Family
    • SOC 346 Work & Occupations
    • SOC 370 Urban Sociology
    • SOC 385 Medical Sociology
  • Pick three from:
    • SOC 425 Sociology of the Family [Topic]
    • SOC 445 Race & Ethnicity [Topic]
    • SOC 446 Sociology of Work [Topic]
    • SOC 447 Sociology of Organizations [Topic]
    • SOC 451 Social Stratification
    • SOC 452 Issues of Migration [Topic]
    • SOC 455 Issues in Sociology of Gender [Topic]
    • SOC 457 Sex & Society
    • SOC 458 Cultural Sociology [Topic]
    • SOC 465 Political Sociology
    • SOC 467 Economic Sociology
    • SOC 491 Sociology of Education
  • 8 credits from any SOC courses (not including core major requirements)

View the full list of required courses in the UO Catalog here.

Major Planing Worksheet – Culture, Identities & Institutions

*in addition to core major requirements; check the full list of requirements for more details.