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The Department of Sociology at the University of Oregon has an unbroken line of descent dating back to when formal courses in sociology were first taught at the University in 1894.  Our primary strengths are in gender, political & economic sociology, and the sociology of the environment.

As a member of the University of Oregon community, you have the right to learn, work, and live in an environment free of discrimination and hate. We all have a responsibility to maintain an environment free of prohibited harassment and discrimination. Resources are readily available here on campus for all students, faculty, and staff: http://respect.uoregon.edu/ 


Stay up to date with the Sociology Department here!

2017 Fred Buttel Distinguished Contribution Award: Professor Richard York

Professor Richard York has been awarded the 2017 Fred Buttel Distinguished Contribution Award from the American Sociological Association Section on Environment and Technology. This award recognizes scholars for outstanding service, innovation, and publication in environmental sociology and/or the sociology of technology.

Congratulations Professor York!

Soc Snippets 5/15/17

Hi all,

Happy Week 7!  We are so close to summer, and for some of you, so close to graduation! This week in Sociology Snippets we’ve got opportunities to participate in the Sociology Department, ways to support your fellow sociology majors and some career resources.

As always if you have any questions or something you’d like to share in Sociology Snippets, just let me know.

Have a great week and Go Ducks!

Professor Pascoe

Join a Focus Group and Share Your Ideas!

Are you a graduating senior? Do you have ideas you want to share about the Sociology Major? The Sociology Department

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Spring Colloquium 6/5/17

Motivational Frame Disputes and Discursive Narratives Surrounding Hydraulic Fracking in the Haynesville Shale

Anthony E. Ladd Professor of Sociology/The Environment Program Loyola University New Orleans

June 5, 2015 12-1 PM 714 PLC

Abstract: Environmental sociologists and social movement scholars have long utilized frame analysis concepts and similar analytic tools to examine how competing groups socially construct discursive interpretations of the environmental hazards, issues, and conflicts in their community (e.g. Brulle and Benford 2012; Capek 1993; Grey 2003, Krogman 1996; Ladd 2011;

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