Skip to Content

Claire Herbert

Claire Herbert profile picture
  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Office: 729 PLC
  • Office Hours: Fall 2022: Tuesdays 8-9am, Fridays 8-9am (by zoom; in person if scheduled ahead of time)
  • Interests: Crime and socio-legal studies, property rights, housing, urban sociology, race, poverty and inequality
  • Website: Website

Biography

Professor Herbert received her B.S. in Sociology and Political Science from University of Oregon in 2006, and her Ph.D in Sociology from University of Michigan in 2016. She was an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Drexel University for three years before joining the Sociology Department at University of Oregon. Her research focuses on law, housing, property, and urban sociology. Her book, A Detroit Story: Urban Decline and the Rise of Property Informality was published with University of California Press in 2021. In this book, she examines the way that de jure illegal uses of property - like squatting, scrapping, and gardening - shape the form of the city, neighborhood conditions, and residents’ well being. Claire is currently conducting research for a project called When Home is Illegal: How Law and Governance Shape Informal Housing in Lane County, examining the interaction between local regulations, enforcement, and the well-being of residents experiencing unsheltered homelessness.

Publications

 

In Press    Claire W. Herbert, Noah Durst, and Deyanira Nevárez Martínez. “A Typology of Informal Housing in the U.S.: Lessons for Planners.” Journal of Planning Education and Research

2021    Claire W. Herbert and Jay Orne. “No Lawless Place: Foregrounding Property in Sociology.” Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World 7(12):1-12. doi: 10.1177/23780231211045448

2018    Claire W. Herbert. “Squatting for Survival: Precarious Housing in a Declining U.S. City.” Housing Policy Debate. 1482:1–17. doi:10.1080/10511482.2018.1461120

2018    Claire W. Herbert. “Like a good neighbor, squatters are there: Property and Neighborhood Stability in the Context of Urban Decline.” City and Community. 17:236-58. doi:10.1111/cico.12275